Monday, July 24, 2006

The Story of Light Entertainment - Double Acts

Good job this was so comprehensive (that can, to some extent, be read as 'long') because for those of us interested in tv there wasn't a whole lot of new information - Eric and Ernie didn't originately want to share a bed on national tv? Well I never.... But it was a decent summing-up exercise, and Stephen Fry could read the phone book (maybe he will) and I'd listen. Good to have the story brought up to date with Ant and Dec and Vic and Bob, too, though they did miss a trick not mentioning the Boosh (oh yes, them again) who are the true successors to 'talking heads' double acts like Pete and Dud. There's a genuine connection, they love to make each other laugh and, importantly, Vince and Howard are - as Noel Fielding has pointed out - essentially Noel and Julian Barratt 'plus ten percent'. Instead, they seemed to suggest that this particular line of succession ends at Little Britain, but I'm not sure that's right. It's a sketch show which happens to have just two regulars... but I'm biased, I guess. :)

10 comments:

Lisa Rullsenberg said...

I think you're right to spot that there's a problem in stopping the narrative where the show did, partly because Little Britain seems to not be quite in the same zone as the Boosh boys (as inheritors to the double act)

Deano said...

You know, I thought that show where people read the phonebook for fifteen minutes was a brilliant idea. Then I saw it cost £5 to get it! A fiver! Six quid on weekends!

As a free show it migh have attracted people out of sheer morbid curiosity (not to mention being finacially viable as it only ties up a venue for 30 minutes and gets people in The Underbelly and going to see other shows with any luck) but at five quid I think the joke is on the audience.

AnnaWaits said...

£5 is a bit much.... but then, I'd only go if I was very interested in the person reading (you find out online on the day), and if I were very interested then I guess I'd pay a fiver. But then I'm a sucker. :)

Billy said...

I'm surprised they didn't mention the Boosh as well. Maybe they count as 'comedy' rather than 'light entertainment' but I have no idea what the difference is.

Dean said...

Unless it's Alyson Hannigan I think I'll keep my money in my pocket and give it a miss (read: use my press pass and watch it).

AnnaWaits said...

Don't kep rubbing it in! ;)

stu_n said...

The Boosh are definitely a double-act, even more so than Ant and Dec (who didn't work together in stand-up, so don't fit the traditional definition). Matt Lucas and David Walliams, I'd argue, aren't a double-act at all, any more than Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse were.

AnnaWaits said...

"Matt Lucas and David Walliams, I'd argue, aren't a double-act at all, any more than Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse were"

You are precisely correct sir. :)

SimonHolyHoses said...

Being venerable and wizened, I remember The Young Ones when it came out, and I watched the video of the first series last week.

They do a sketch in it that spoofs all the "variety" entertainment that dominated the TV schedules in the day - people like Dickie Henderson, and Sammy Davis Junior. You were never quite sure what they were famous for, or excactly what bits were meant to be, you know, entertaining.

Anyway, this sketch really was funny. They start on the golf course telling a couple of cheesy jokes, then "magically" walk off screen and appear in the studio on stage ready to perform a duet.

So then Nigel Planer and Rick Mayall, in character, perform this suave light entertainment number in the cheesy, faux jazzy style. The lyrics are CLASS though...

"Tying my dog to a railroad track,
Choo choo train gonna break his back.
We used to call him Spot
But now he's called Splat,
'Cause that's the kind of person we are.
Say baby won't you come home with me."

So true to life.

Lisa Rullsenberg said...

"They do a sketch in it that spoofs all the "variety" entertainment that dominated the TV schedules in the day - people like Dickie Henderson, and Sammy Davis Junior. You were never quite sure what they were famous for, or excactly what bits were meant to be, you know, entertaining."

That is SO true... I guess some would say they were just 'stars', but nowadays we want our entertainers to be doing something... not sure what though.